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War and Peace (Pevear/Volokhonsky Translation)
War and Peace (Pevear/Volokhonsky Translation)

War and Peace (Pevear/Volokhonsky Translation). Leo Tolstoy

War and Peace (Pevear/Volokhonsky Translation)


War.and.Peace.Pevear.Volokhonsky.Translation.pdf
ISBN: 9781400079988 | 1296 pages | 22 Mb


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War and Peace (Pevear/Volokhonsky Translation) Leo Tolstoy
Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group



Most recent fun: a review of War and Peace, translated by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky. Cunningham's introduction was written before all of thehullabaloo over the Pevear and Volokhonsky translations of War and Peace. After reading their 2007 translation of War and Peace, Orlando Figes, the eminent Russian historian, did not mince words about Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky. Book Review: The Death of Ivan Ilyich & Other Stories by Leo Tolstoy; Translated by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky. Reading: War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy (Pevear and Volokhonsky translation). December 17, 2009 by theculturalobserver. Although Leo Tolstoy Two years ago, Pevear and Volokhonsky also published their hefty, beautiful version of War and Peace, enthralling readers of serious literature and becoming the subject of a four-week online discussion presided by the New York Times. I have read Crime and Punishment, The Brothers Karamazov, and The Idiot, each translated by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky. Zhivago is not a novel in the usual sense. This new version by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky — who most recently, in 2007, gave us their War and Peace— won't change that. Over the past few weeks, there's been an ongoing discussion of the new Pevear and Volokhonsky translation of War and Peace in the NY Times Reading Room. War and Peace especially is a transformation and revelation. The job of the 1 War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy. Since Tolstoy seems to have command of ever facet of literary technique in War and Peace, why should metaphor be an exception? The first translation I read YEARS ago was Constance Garnett's from 1901, and it didn't have even a fraction of the life-force of the Pevear/Volokhonsky version. Not that any translation really could.